Delphi Handbooks Collection


Delphi XE Handbook


Delphi 2010 Handbook


August 25, 2009

Delphi 2010 Released

Today Embarcadero Technologies released Delphi 2010 (along with C++Builder 2010, Delphi Prism 2010, and RAD Studio 2010). The feature set is quite interesting...

Today Embarcadero Technologies released Delphi 2010 (along with C++Builder 2010, Delphi Prism 2010, and RAD Studio 2010). You can see the formal announcement in the Delphi 2010 press release. The product is already available!

Beside the videos on the www.embarcadero.com/rad-studio-2010 site, you can get detailed information including the Data Sheet (PDF), the Delphi Frequently Asked Questions, the Features Matrix, a What's New in 2010, and Licensing on the updated product home page at www.embarcadero.com/delphi.

Officially, the four new/improved areas of the product are:

  • Touch and gesture support
  • Extended database connectivity
  • Improved developer productivity
  • Language and compiler enhancements

Notice that a 30-days trial version is available at downloads.embarcadero.com/free/delphi. Notice also that prices are very similar to those of Delphi 2009 and taht Embarcadero has extended the BOGO offer (Buy One, Get One free).

What's my personal take on the new features of the product? There are a few I like a lot:

  • New IDE features are extensible, as you can create your own extra IDE Insight entries, performing just about any action you like, and you can provide custom debugger views.
  • The Extended RTTI and Attributes make dynamic applications much more powerful, as you have already started to see in a few blog posts.
  • There is a lot of support for Windows 7 features. I'm playing with Direct2D more than with gestures. Also there is a new dynamic invocation mechanism for library functions making it much easier to have a single executable supporting multiple versions of Windows. Rather than manually loading DLLs and calling GetProcAddress you simply mark exported functions as dynamic.
  • On the database site, my vote for best features goes to the dbExpress driver for Firebird. Also the new driver for SQL Server, which uses the client library rather than the OLEDB layer, is interesting.
  • HTTP extensions for DataSnap are very cool, while I still have mixed feelings for the REST support. I'll be able to judge after working more on it.
  • And many, many, and many other features that have been long awaited and cannot be considered as minor.

What about a new book on the product? A "Delphi 2010 Handbook" is coming, albeit not very soon. At this point, it is looking like a 250 page book, with lots of in-depth coverage of new features. I might also create a "book compilation", including the three handbooks on Delphi 2007, Delphi 2009, and Delphi 2010.





 

28 Comments

Delphi 2010 Released 

marco, if you flip through internet pages, delpho 
blogs and forums, you will find a lot of developers 
uppgrading from Delphi 5 or Delphi 7 to Delphi 2009. 
maybe because of the stability of Delphi 5 & 7 , and 
problems found in next versions until delphi 2009 
released.

  So, a book covering the upgrading from Delphi 5 or 
7 to 2009 or 2010 will worth it.
Comment by Ahmad on August 25, 11:55

Delphi 2010 Released 

Hi I believe the Delphi 2007 Handbook already fills
that gap since Delphi 7. :)
Comment by Lex Li [http://lextm.blogspot.com] on August 25, 12:29

Delphi 2010 Released 

I'm still waiting for the availability of ther german 
version of your Delphi 2009 book (Software & Support 
Verlag). The release date was changed from month to 
month. Will this ever be released?
Comment by Mathias [] on August 25, 14:13

Delphi 2010 Released 

Until there is no 64bit compiler, don't see any
reasons to upgrade from 2009.
Comment by Alexander on August 25, 17:51

Delphi 2010 Released 

 Marco:  I'd love to hear more about your experiences 
with Direct2D.
Comment by Greg on August 25, 18:05

Delphi 2010 Released 

Alexander: You are right. x64 compiler support is very
important. Nobody wants to buy Delphi again because I
bet Embarcadero will sell the same Delphi with x64
support again.

Otherwise, there are a lot of problems with Delphi
Win32. There is no a normal data binding model. There
are no modern/declarative language features like
lambda expressions. Instead of this, you have to write
for/while/repeat cycles, etc. The VCL class library is
buggly and imprecise. For instance, look at the
FileExists implementation of Delphi and .NET. The .NET
version may be faster because MS examines the function
parameters properly, etc. It was just an example, but
this is the real world. Delphi Prism is another
category. Prism is a very good opportunity to leave
the old Win32 world. Let's go.
Comment by littlegopher [http://janosjanka,spaces.live.com] on August 25, 23:07

New Handbook 

I look forward to your new book
Comment by Alister Christie [http://codegearguru.com] on August 26, 01:50

Delphi 2010 Released 

It is great that there is a dbExpress driver for 
Firebird again in Delphi 2010.
I used it in Delphi 6. In Delphi 2005/2007 it did 
not work anymore. I waited a few years. Finally I 
moved to MySQL.

Now I am waiting for 64-bit Delphi on Leopard/Snow 
Leopard and Ubuntu.
I do not hope that I have to wait as long as for 
Firebird.
Comment by Hubert Anemaat [http://www.anemaat.nl] on August 26, 11:10

Delphi 2010 Released 

[Off]
Otherwise, I don't want to predict, but I think that 
Delphi 2010 (Win32) is an excelent tool to maintain 
existing projects. In spite of this, if you want to 
create a new project, I suggest .NET. The JIT 
compiled native code (.NET 4.0 Beta 1) will be the 
same efficient:

Delphi 2009 (native code)
SEQ: 4992 ms
DPL: 2872 ms

C# 4.0 (.NET 4.0 Beta 1)
SEQ: 4923 ms
PFX: 2873 ms

It is worth reading these articles (.NET 4.0 DLR): 
http://unbornchikken.spaces.live.com/blog/cns!
1BE6B7B78A988D1F!759.entry
[/Off]
Comment by littlegopher [http://janosjanka.spaces.live.com] on August 26, 15:17

Delphi 2010 Released 

Comment by littlegopher: "Prism is a very good
opportunity to leave the old Win32 world. Let's go."

Go where? Why balance on a wobbly chair when you can
stand on the same firm ground the chair itself is
standing on?

Comment by ken knopfli on August 26, 15:42

Delphi 2010 Released 

littlegopher, do you have royalties on .NET 
deployments? Benchmarks with just strange acronims 
and numbers are just acronims and numbers - nothing 
more.
I see no reason for you posting here unless you need 
to be self-reassured of your choices. Do you 
prefer .NET? No one is telling you to use Delphi. You 
should be happy to have all these competitors using 
inferior products like Delphi or C++, your .NET apps 
will shine and give all the advantages. Or not? 
Comment by Luigi D. Sandon on August 26, 17:53

Delphi 2010 Released 

I'm just trying to outline that Win32 becomes 
obsolete in the near future. In spite of this, I like 
Delphi and Delphi .NET too. But if there are 
problems, then I will tell the truth.
Comment by littlegopher [http://janosjanka.spaces.live.com] on August 26, 19:35

Delphi 2010 Released 

Glad to see there are a few people still mentioning 
64bit, even as D2010 is released. 

I don't expect Embarcadero to talk about anything 
else but their new baby for the next 2-3 months, but 
still I'd love to hear then start talking about which 
quarter they are targeting for D2010x64.  

We haven't had a "proper" roadmap since before 
Embarcadero bought CodeGear. D2010 / "Weaver" came 
out of nowhere to knock "Commodore" into the long(er) 
grass. We still need a document based roadmap that 
Embarcadero will commit AND stick to this time 
around. 

We have suffered in a major way through the continual 
u-turns on the 64bit project. This has to be the next 
Delphi deliverable. I know cross platform is, or at 
least was, ahead in terms of development progress.  
Again, this came out of nowhere, whereas 64 bit has 
been "promised" and is overdue - measured in years 
now. 

Embarcadero, please deliver.
Comment by Paul on August 26, 19:36

Delphi 2010 Released 

I have a couple of questions:
1) I was under the impression that D2010 was already a
64-bits compiler. Was I mistaken?
2) I downloaded the trial version, but before
installing it and juggle around I wanted to be sure
that this version can coexist with my D2007 without
interferences. Can you clarify that to me?
Appreciate your comments.
Regards,
Comment by Eduardo on August 26, 21:06

Delphi 2010 Released 

Of course, Delphi 2010 is very nice work, but it is 
incomplete and expensive (in gold price :)). Visual 
Studio Standard Edition has more and more features 
(every database tool and designer support) and is 
cheaper. In addition, I'm sure you have to buy VCL 
Framework which is adopting .NET Framework features 
now (directory IO classes ~ .NET System.IO namespace, 
custom attributes, generics, etc.).
Comment by littlegopher [http://janosjanka.spaces.live.com] on August 26, 22:33

Delphi 2010 Released 

After all trouble they have had with Help nobody 
checks if F1 works in Object Inspector ?

Big OOPS
Comment by Pratt on August 27, 13:25

Delphi 2010 Released 

Luigi: "Benchmarks with just strange acronims 
and numbers are just acronims and numbers - nothing 
more."

http://unbornchikken.spaces.live.com/blog/cns!
1BE6B7B78A988D1F!904.entry

The evidences:

Delphi tests:
http://w.pgy.hu/~worm/het/colorize/

.NET 4.0 tests:
http://cid-
1be6b7b78a988d1f.skydrive.live.com/browse.aspx/Project
s/ColorizePFX

Prime tests:
http://janosjanka.spaces.live.com/blog/cns!
E5C994C03FC0E370!138.entry
Comment by littlegopher [http://janosjanka.spaces.live.com] on August 27, 13:59

Delphi 2010 Released 

littlegopher, are you a MS rep??? generics etc. are 
not at all .NET born features - C++ had generics for 
years (and if Borland had listened to its users, 
Delphi too), or would you like to talk about NET 4.0 
getting default parameters which Delphi had from its 
4.0 release ten years ago? :) Or would you like to 
talk about .NET Delphi roots (Hejlsberg & others) - 
or it being a Java clone? Languages always copied 
each other - nothing new.
And AFAIK, VS has no native applications form 
designer. Am I wrong? :P
About your benchmarks, I see very authoritative sites 
and precise comparisons... c'mon!
About the prices, you're right. VS is cheaper. It's 
just a way to sel l you the whole MS stack. I prefer 
more freedom, even if I have to pay more.
Comment by Luigi D. Sandon on August 27, 20:00

Delphi 2010 Released 

"littlegopher, are you a MS rep???" LOL :)

"generics etc. are not at all .NET born features - 
C++ had generics for years"

Let's stop. C++ = templates, .NET = generics. These 
are different conceptions 
(http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-
us/magazine/cc163788.aspx). Why does Delphi 
follow .NET's generic implementation? Because the 
generic type parameter feature is a .NET feature (and 
type safe).

"Or would you like to talk about NET 4.0 
getting default parameters which Delphi had from its 
4.0 release ten years ago? :)"

And lambdas + LINQ? :)

"Or it being a Java clone?"
Are you kidding? :) People like writing it.

Of course, I understand that you like using Delphi 
Win32. Moreover, I also like using Delphi Win32. But 
if you use .NET, then you'll get every infrastructure 
in order to develop modern/totally OOP applications 
with modern hardware accelerated user interface. In 
addition, the Jitter will optimalize your code for 
the current PC's CPU. The Garbage Collector is also 
useful. Unfortunately, native codes are a lot of 
inherited problems. But as you can see, the managed 
code is the same efficient. It is worth thinking 
about it.
Comment by littlegopher [http://janosjanka.spaces.live.com] on August 27, 21:40

Delphi 2010 Released 

Finally, I've found Eric Lippert's article about 
generics (Generics are not templates): 
http://blogs.msdn.com/ericlippert/archive/2009/07/30/g
enerics-are-not-templates.aspx

Frankly, I don't want to quarrel with you. I just 
like saying the truth. If something is good, then 
that is good. But if something is 
bad/incomplete/buggly, there are no limits... :)
Comment by littlegopher [http://janosjanka.spaces.live.com] on August 28, 02:16

Delphi 2010 Released 

You're really a MS rep :) Glad to know MS is worried 
again about Delphi.

"Let's stop. C++ = templates, .NET = generics. These 
are different conceptions"
They may be implemented in different ways because C++ 
outputs native code that can't be changed at runtime 
while .NET outputs p-code that can get changed later, 
but they do exactly the same thing. From the 
developer point of view, they are exactly the same 
thing. Neverthelss, it does not look that MS 
abandoned C++...

"And lambdas + LINQ?"
Lambdas are from functional languages. .NET borrowed 
from them, nothing new, Lisp (!) had them ages 
before. LINQ is the old dBase way of programming with 
databases - with all those risks, and even MS is 
preferring other solutions now. And basically it 
worked only with SQL Server.

"Are you kidding? :) People like writing it." You are 
kidding. C# *is* a Java clone - same architecture, 
same syntax, same target - born after Sun sued MS. 
Only a MS rep could deny it.

"then you'll get every infrastructure 
in order to develop modern/totally OOP applications 
with modern hardware accelerated user interface"

Stop reading marketing stuff, please. I am 
developing "totally OO" applications since Turbo 
Pascal introduced OO ages before MS undesrtood what 
an object is and hired Hejlsberg to let them know.

"Hardware accelerated" user interfaces depends only 
on the OS - GDI (pre Vista) *is* hardware accelerated 
as Direct2D is in Windows 7. If Vista was a silly 
realease that's not a Delphi issue.
Writing a "modern" application depends only on the 
programmer's skill - you can use any latest 
technology you like, any framework you like, and 
still write old and bad applications - eventually, 
everything becomes CPU code to be run.

"Unfortunately, native codes are a lot of inherited 
problems."
Only for those who can't "manage" it. If you're happy 
playing in your sandbox, do it, who forbids you? I 
see no reason why you should start to post all this 
FUD on a post about D2010 release. Don't you like it? 
Use VS, what's the problem? Are you afraid your 
choice is wrong and need to reassured? Go to a MS 
forum, they will be happy to tell you .NET is the 
best.

"Frankly, I don't want to quarrel with you. I just 
like saying the truth."
You are just saying what you believe to be the truth, 
using very weak arguments to prove it. We don't 
need .NET "evangelists" cartrying the "truth" here...

"bad/incomplete/buggly, there are no limits..."
Well, good, why do you spend your time in this 
incomplete buggy world? Again, you should be happy, 
as long as people write applications with those 
bad/incomplete/buggy tools you will surely overcome 
any competition with your .NET applications - or are 
you afraid it won't happen, and trying to level the 
field?
Comment by Luigi D. Sandon on August 28, 11:15

Delphi 2010 Released 

1. "Lambdas are from functional languages."
I know it. In spite of this, Delphi Win32 still have 
not implemented these. Since you've mentioned default 
parameters (co/contra). ;) 

2."C# *is* a Java clone"
Microsoft J# was a Java clone.

3. UI  
http://blogs.microsoft.co.il/blogs/janiv/archive/2009/
06/07/hardware-acceleration-in-wpf.aspx

4. "Only for those who can't "manage" it. If you're 
happy playing in your sandbox, do it, who forbids 
you? I see no reason why you should start to post all 
this FUD on a post about D2010 release. Don't you 
like it?"

You misunderstand me entirely. But if you want, I can 
tell you what I like in Delphi 2010. For instance, 
Embarcadero has repaired every generic bug. In 
addition, there is also a new RTTI API. You don't 
have to be afraid, I can manage it. For instance, 
I've been working on an own Win32 (managed) class 
library:

http://cid-
c3e2695fc6f7b0a4.skydrive.live.com/browse.aspx/Nyilv%
c3%a1nos/Code/Delphi%20for%20Win32/Net%20for%20Win32

http://cid-
c3e2695fc6f7b0a4.skydrive.live.com/browse.aspx/Nyilv%
c3%a1nos/Code/Delphi%20for%20Win32/Futures

The problem is that RTL class library is smaller 
than .NET class library. There is no HashSet, 
SortedSet, SortedDictionary, SortedList, etc. I don't 
understand why is so good without all of these. You 
have to write everything again. Additionally, you 
have to pay for it. An upgrade license's price is 
also a goldmine.

Marketing? Here it is:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8zqXOtl6B44
Comment by littlegopher [http://janosjanka.spaces.live.com] on August 31, 01:36

Delphi 2010 Released 

"Delphi Win32 still have not implemented these". Nor 
C++ did, for example. Or other languages. 
You could even code excellent applications without 
them - whatever the syntax is the must become a bunch 
of ASM instructions - like any other syntax.

Delphi anonymous methods are one step in that 
direction - but not everything "fashionable" is 
needed to write good applications. Is functional 
programming the future? Maybe. Or maybe not. Or maybe 
a hybrid of both paradigms. But the "neighbour's 
garden is always greener" is usually the wrong 
paradigm. 

I don't compare Delphi with .NET, sorry, I compare it 
to C++. If I had to work with another 
language/compiler, I'd use C++ - the applications we 
write are already partly C++, and .NET (or Java) 
wouldn't cover our needs.

"hardware-acceleration-in-wpf.aspx"

It uses DirectX technology - because the OS supports 
it - and then? Just a complex way to draw 2D 
surfaces. There is a reason why MS introduced 
Direct2D in Windows 7 - and backported it to Vista. 
Look in the same blogs you cite so frequently.

"Microsoft J# was a Java clone.". No, you're wrong. 
It was J++. Then MS was sued by Sun because of its 
non-compliance with Java standards. Failed this 
attempt to make a Windows-only Java, they 
released .NET using a Java-like architecture, a C-
like language as Java did, but without calling it 
J<something> and any compatibility to avoid 
litigations. J# was just a way to lure Java 
programmers to .NET. Your knowledge of IT history is 
a bit partisan.

"I've been working on an own Win32 (managed) class 
library". Frankly, I prefer to manage code myself - 
see no reason to lose the advantages of native code 
to ape .NET "just because".

Has Delphi issues? Yes, it has (and .NET too...), and 
I am one who often pointed them out. But one of its 
latest bigger issue was apeing .NET or other 
fashionable language like Ruby or the like, too much 
instead of assessing its developers needs and moving 
in that direction.

"The problem is that RTL class library is smaller 
than .NET class library." I can't deny the RTL is 
smaller ... MS can pay much more programmers than 
others - but in the last twenty years I collect the 
needed libraries, some written by myself, some are 
open source ones (like JCL that).
But being larger does not mean being better - one of 
the risks of a large library is that implementations 
that may be not the best at all are used just because 
there is no other choice.

Do you know there are developers who use Intel 
compilers and RTLs because they may be better than MS 
ones, and offer more advanced features? Having 
*choices* is always better - competition drives 
innovation. 
Comment by on August 31, 13:16

Delphi 2010 Released 

"Is functional programming the future? Maybe. Or 
maybe not. Or maybe a hybrid of both paradigms."

Why? Maybe, do you like writing "books"? I don't 
guess it. Functional syntax is compact and more 
expressive.

"It uses DirectX technology..."

This is not so simple. There is also tool support for 
these (Blend 3.0, Media Encoder, etc.) + Silverlight 
3.0. Don't compare it to Windows 7's Direct2D native 
API.

"But being larger does not mean being better - one of 
the risks of a large library is that implementations 
that may be not the best at all are used just because 
there is no other choice."

I hate third party things. I like that MS gives me 
the entire framework. In addition, .NET 
implementation is more precise than other/third party 
implementations. Of course, since MS is developing 
Windows (too), this isn't a miracle. ;)

Frankly, I'm not an OpenSource fun. 
Comment by littlegopher [http://janosjanka.spaces.live.com] on August 31, 19:32

Delphi 2010 Released 

There won't be agreement.

I'm also a Delphi fun. Get it? But if you can't 
understand my opinion about this business strategy, 
then I can do nothing. Expensive, expensive, 
expensive!

I can only say it: Microsoft .NET Framework is not an 
enemy. Its job is to help developers to create 
reliable and efficient applications for every 
Microsoft platform. In addition, it is cheap. You 
handle this question like a public enemy. Or, don't 
you want to learn new things? If it is the problem, 
then I understand you. But .NET FX is not an enemy 
because of it. Delphi Prism a live evidence. Or, 
Prism is also a silly thing? Sorry, Microsoft is 
being silly because they give us tools so that we can 
develop modern applications cheaply. Ooops! Microsoft 
is an enemy! ;)
Comment by littlegopher [http://janosjanka.spaces.live.com] on August 31, 23:04

Delphi 2010 Released 

"Functional syntax is compact and more 
expressive." Sometimes. Sometimes not. SQL is very 
compact and expressive, for example, why would you 
need other ways to manipulate data?

"There is also tool support for these (Blend 3.0, 
Media Encoder, etc.) + Silverlight 3.0."

Here's the MS rep! Bind everything to MS technologies!

"In addition, .NET implementation is more precise 
than other/third party implementations."

Proofs?

"I hate third party things." I like them. Many .NET 
developers to get decent UI are using third-party 
controls... like Developer Express.

" Its job is to help developers to create reliable 
and efficient applications "

It's job it's to sell more MS stuff to pay what they 
give away for free or alike. MS is about making 
money, like everybody else, but they have a very 
integral approach.

" don't you want to learn new things?"

I learn those new things useful for my job, and .NET 
isn't. I know Java, if I need a VM solution I prefer 
a portable one (no, Mono is not a portable solution).

"Prism is a silly thing". The whole Delphi .NET 
approach was a silly thing. And they paid it dearly.

"Microsoft is being silly because they give us tools 
so that we can develop modern applications cheaply"

Cheaply? MS is not a charity. What they give with one 
hand they get with the other. 
Comment by on September 1, 11:11

Delphi 2010 Released 

A multi-platform Delphi will be much better than a
64-bit windows only compiler. There is so much cool
stuff going on with MS.NET these days that not even a
64-bit Delphi can compete with the likes of Visual
Studio. I guess it's about time to cut the cord tying
Delphi to Microsoft and build a cross platform
framework that enables Delphi to run on other OS
environments like Linux. Maybe we'll see a renaissance
of Delphi when that happens.
Comment by Sonny Eugenio on January 30, 22:21

Delphi 2010 Released 

 Unfortunately I have to rewrite my products in gcc,
which is free, cross-platform and can build 32/64 bits
binaries. 

 The Delphi is excellent in win32 programming, and can
save the developers lots of time indeed, but the
customers do not care about how you develop the
product, they need the 64bit product to run smoothly
in modern PC hardware.

 For old delphi-made products, I will port them to
FreePascal, but for new product I'll stick to pure C++
(gcc/STL/boost/Qt,etc.) toolset.
Comment by Randy on April 9, 01:32


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